Which way to go?

These two alloys are often confused as being almost the same, which is almost true. They are both nickel alloys and share many key characteristics. AL6XN and Alloy 20 are alike in that they each retain their strength to about 1000°F. In addition they both perform well, in salt water environments, providing excellent resistance to crevice and pitting corrosion as well as stress corrosion cracking. This is where their similarities actually end. In this brief newsletter, we’ll highlight key differences between AL6XN and Alloy 20, so you’ll know when to select one alloy over the other.

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inconel-vs-monelThey rhyme, are both used in extreme environments, and are both nickel metal alloys, but Monel and Inconel are actually very different. But how?

Let’s start with basic chemistry. Monel is a nickel-copper alloy and Inconel is a nickel-chromium alloy. So what does that mean for your extreme application? We will take a look at a side-by-side comparisons of these two alloys to help you better understand which is best for your challenging application. Continue reading

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cold-weldThread galling is a common yet a seldom understood fastener problem seen by engineers and fabricators. It occurs when pressure and friction cause bolt threads to seize to the threads of a nut or tapped hole. The fasteners are not just overly tight but “cold/contact” welded together. Continue reading

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625-vs-718Inconel fasteners are commonly used for extreme environments and come in various “flavors” depending on the needs of the application. This brief paper will give you a quick comparison of the two most popular grades, Inconel 625 and Inconel 718 to help you choose the best material. Continue reading

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lock-nut-pic-1A lock nut resists loosening from vibrations and torque. Specialty material lock nuts offer the ideal solution to many extreme applications environments. They combine the unique properties of specialty materials, with the secure locking feature of a lock nut to prevent failures in the field. Continue reading

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NASA has been designing rockets and manned space ships for over 50 years, but nothing star-wars-x-wing-fighterlike the innovation needed to build a light-speed, fighter spacecraft. At Extreme Bolt, we supply the aviation industry with a diversity of fasteners made from extreme materials. Though Star Wars is a fictitious story, it is fun to ponder how engineers could construct such advanced vehicles. This quick post will review the top three fastener materials that should be considered to a make fighter that could defeat the Death Star.

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vacfurnaceVacuum furnaces offer engineers a unique processing environment: high temperatures,
controlled atmospheres, and rapid cooling. This low contamination environment is perfect for brazing, sintering, and heat treatment. Due to the constant extreme temperatures (typically 1,100–1,500°C), choosing the right fastener material can be a challenge. This brief paper will give you an overview on what high temperature materials will work best for your vacuum furnace fastener needs. As always, if you have a specific concern, contact us, for material analysis by one of our engineering team members.

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So you’ve heard the term, but what is it? Technically, it is a method in which an alloy’s structural matrix is altered on an atomic level by using temperature change to enhance the material’s mechanical properties – increasing the yield and tensile strength. Simply, it is a way to further strengthen a material. It is most often utilized on aluminum, magnesium, nickel, titanium and steel alloys to create extreme high-temperature strength. Continue reading

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Tension, Not Torque Matters: How to Measure Bolt Tensionmeasure

In our last post, we discussed how measuring torque is an inaccurate way of getting the right bolt tension.  In fact, a brand new bolt will require +/-40% torque to achieve the same tension as another new bolt out of the same box. Since tension holds a bolt in place, getting it right is critical: too tight and the bolt can break; too weak and the bolt can loosen. So if a torque chart isn’t worth the paper it’s written on, how do we measure tension? Continue reading

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(Stay tuned next week for Part 2 – How to Measure Tension)tension

Everyone is always concerned about getting the right torque. Regularly, customers contact  us requesting material torque charts.  Everyone is so concerned about what they are setting their torque wrench to, that they are missing what matters most: getting the right tension.Getting the right tension cannot be achieved by looking at a torque chart or purchasing a top-of-the-line wrench. Even a brand new bolt will require +/-40% torque to achieve the same tension as another new bolt out of the same box. Continue reading

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